Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

Hurricane Katrina was responsible for hundreds of deaths, billions of dollars of damage, and left the levee system in New Orleans in a state of disrepair. Many levees that make up the Flood Protection system for New Orleans were overtopped and sustained considerable damage. This case history will look at one section of levee in New Orleans East designated LPV (Lake Pontchartrain and Vicinity) -111 that is 5.3 miles in length. LPV-111 was overtopped and breeches occurred adjacent to structures. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) was tasked to not only repair the levee, but also to raise the effective height to provide the One Hundred Year level of protection by increasing the levee crown from Elevation 17’ to Elevation 28’. A conventional levee with stability berms was quickly ruled out due to the limited right-of-way that existed due to the close proximity of the Bayou Sauvage Wildlife Refuge. In order to stabilize the weak soils underlying the existing levee, the USACE decided to improve the characteristics of the soils by utilizing the Deep Mixing Method (DMM). The DMM would create a stable foundation on which the height of the levee could be increased while also controlling overall settlement and provide lateral stability to resist future storm surges. The project consisted of stabilizing more than 1.6 million cubic yards of soil to depths up to approximately 70’ while using over 460,000 tons of binder consisting of both Ordinary Portland Cement and Blast Furnace Slag. Eight deep mixing rigs were used to successfully complete the project while working around the clock for a total of 14 months. The project was an outstanding technical success and is the largest deep mixing project in the world, outside of Japan.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Levee Foundation Remediation Using the Deep Mix Method

Chicago, Illinois

Hurricane Katrina was responsible for hundreds of deaths, billions of dollars of damage, and left the levee system in New Orleans in a state of disrepair. Many levees that make up the Flood Protection system for New Orleans were overtopped and sustained considerable damage. This case history will look at one section of levee in New Orleans East designated LPV (Lake Pontchartrain and Vicinity) -111 that is 5.3 miles in length. LPV-111 was overtopped and breeches occurred adjacent to structures. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) was tasked to not only repair the levee, but also to raise the effective height to provide the One Hundred Year level of protection by increasing the levee crown from Elevation 17’ to Elevation 28’. A conventional levee with stability berms was quickly ruled out due to the limited right-of-way that existed due to the close proximity of the Bayou Sauvage Wildlife Refuge. In order to stabilize the weak soils underlying the existing levee, the USACE decided to improve the characteristics of the soils by utilizing the Deep Mixing Method (DMM). The DMM would create a stable foundation on which the height of the levee could be increased while also controlling overall settlement and provide lateral stability to resist future storm surges. The project consisted of stabilizing more than 1.6 million cubic yards of soil to depths up to approximately 70’ while using over 460,000 tons of binder consisting of both Ordinary Portland Cement and Blast Furnace Slag. Eight deep mixing rigs were used to successfully complete the project while working around the clock for a total of 14 months. The project was an outstanding technical success and is the largest deep mixing project in the world, outside of Japan.