Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

The floors and non load bearing walls of a house, having expansive black cotton soil underneath, have been repaired by two methods. A part of the damaged house floors and walls were repaired by the conventional method i.e. removing the expansive soil completely and replacing with non expansive granular material. The remaining part was repaired by integrated approach as described later by Jain and Mewade (2010). The Jain and Mewade (2010) approach consists of removing the expansive soil underneath the damaged floor by about 0.5m, making 50mm diameter, 1m deep holes at 0.75m centre to centre and filling lime slurry in the holes. The broken floor debris and non expansive soil was then filled up to the floor base level and the cement concrete floor was reconstructed. The floor constructed by removal of expansive soil by 1.5m depth in the first method and partial removal and making lime piles in the second method are performing well with no sign of settlement or unevenness any where. The paper presents the success story of one such house repaired by these methods in the year 2008. The second method requires only partial removal and replacement of problematic soil beneath the floor and therefore is fast and economical in comparison to conventional method.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Repair of Sunken Floor by Integrated Approach: A Case Study

Chicago, Illinois

The floors and non load bearing walls of a house, having expansive black cotton soil underneath, have been repaired by two methods. A part of the damaged house floors and walls were repaired by the conventional method i.e. removing the expansive soil completely and replacing with non expansive granular material. The remaining part was repaired by integrated approach as described later by Jain and Mewade (2010). The Jain and Mewade (2010) approach consists of removing the expansive soil underneath the damaged floor by about 0.5m, making 50mm diameter, 1m deep holes at 0.75m centre to centre and filling lime slurry in the holes. The broken floor debris and non expansive soil was then filled up to the floor base level and the cement concrete floor was reconstructed. The floor constructed by removal of expansive soil by 1.5m depth in the first method and partial removal and making lime piles in the second method are performing well with no sign of settlement or unevenness any where. The paper presents the success story of one such house repaired by these methods in the year 2008. The second method requires only partial removal and replacement of problematic soil beneath the floor and therefore is fast and economical in comparison to conventional method.