Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

An unexpected response occurred as piles were driven within 3 feet of the west wall of an existing municipal drinking water storage reservoir. Being located in a confined urban space, the expansion of the parking garage at a facility on the south end of Lake Michigan required the installation of 122 steel H-piles as close as 3 feet to the reservoir. Historically, structures on the site were supported on either shallow spread footings or H-piles driven to bedrock. At the contractor’s suggestion, considerable project savings were achieved by driving the H-piles to an extremely hard clay layer (“Chicago hardpan”) above the bedrock. Pressuremeter testing, and static and dynamic load testing of the H-piles were completed as part of the project testing program. Both the horizontal and vertical movements of the reservoir wall were monitored during pile driving. The paper presents the design parameter changes, static and dynamic pile testing, and vibration monitoring for construction of the multi-level parking structure adjacent to the 8 million gallon drinking water storage facility. The vertical movements of the tank’s west wall and the corrective actions taken after water began seeping from pre-existing cracks in the tanks wall are the focus of the case study.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Pile Driving Adjacent to Municipal Drinking Water Storage Facility

Chicago, Illinois

An unexpected response occurred as piles were driven within 3 feet of the west wall of an existing municipal drinking water storage reservoir. Being located in a confined urban space, the expansion of the parking garage at a facility on the south end of Lake Michigan required the installation of 122 steel H-piles as close as 3 feet to the reservoir. Historically, structures on the site were supported on either shallow spread footings or H-piles driven to bedrock. At the contractor’s suggestion, considerable project savings were achieved by driving the H-piles to an extremely hard clay layer (“Chicago hardpan”) above the bedrock. Pressuremeter testing, and static and dynamic load testing of the H-piles were completed as part of the project testing program. Both the horizontal and vertical movements of the reservoir wall were monitored during pile driving. The paper presents the design parameter changes, static and dynamic pile testing, and vibration monitoring for construction of the multi-level parking structure adjacent to the 8 million gallon drinking water storage facility. The vertical movements of the tank’s west wall and the corrective actions taken after water began seeping from pre-existing cracks in the tanks wall are the focus of the case study.