Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

Steel piles are known for their high resistance to driving and handling, as well as their large lateral stiffness. Difficulty of driving depends on the subsurface conditions, pile type, and type of impact hammer used to drive piles. This case history presents observations of pile construction for a bridge widening retrofit in the city of Irwindale. The proposed foundations consisted of twenty seven 14-inch-diameter Caltrans Standard Plan B2-5 Alternative V closed-end pipe piles with quarter-inch thick steel sections. Piles were 35 feet in length and were designed to be driven piles. Subsurface investigations indicated the soils consisted of silty gravels with sand and silty sands with gravel in a medium dense condition. Excavations for the pile cap revealed a large amount of cobbles and boulders unknown during design. Difficult driving conditions resulted in failure of several closed-end steel pipe piles. Attempts at driving open-ended steel pipe piles also failed. Mushrooming of pile tops as well as buckling and shearing of piles was observed during pile driving. Failed piles were extracted for further examination. An alternative method of installation was developed to minimize the impact to the original scope of work and utilize materials already furnished for the job. The alternative method of installation consisted of pre-drilling 20-inch-diameter holes to pile tip elevation, and placing the steel shells in open excavations without driving. High-strength grout was used to fill in the annular space between the steel pipe pile and the surrounding soils. Analysis was performed to ensure the alternative installation method did not adversely affect the required load capacity of the piles.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Performance of Driven Piles in Gravelly Sands With Cobbles

Chicago, Illinois

Steel piles are known for their high resistance to driving and handling, as well as their large lateral stiffness. Difficulty of driving depends on the subsurface conditions, pile type, and type of impact hammer used to drive piles. This case history presents observations of pile construction for a bridge widening retrofit in the city of Irwindale. The proposed foundations consisted of twenty seven 14-inch-diameter Caltrans Standard Plan B2-5 Alternative V closed-end pipe piles with quarter-inch thick steel sections. Piles were 35 feet in length and were designed to be driven piles. Subsurface investigations indicated the soils consisted of silty gravels with sand and silty sands with gravel in a medium dense condition. Excavations for the pile cap revealed a large amount of cobbles and boulders unknown during design. Difficult driving conditions resulted in failure of several closed-end steel pipe piles. Attempts at driving open-ended steel pipe piles also failed. Mushrooming of pile tops as well as buckling and shearing of piles was observed during pile driving. Failed piles were extracted for further examination. An alternative method of installation was developed to minimize the impact to the original scope of work and utilize materials already furnished for the job. The alternative method of installation consisted of pre-drilling 20-inch-diameter holes to pile tip elevation, and placing the steel shells in open excavations without driving. High-strength grout was used to fill in the annular space between the steel pipe pile and the surrounding soils. Analysis was performed to ensure the alternative installation method did not adversely affect the required load capacity of the piles.