Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

The paper explores ways to effective professional development of junior engineering educators, to enable them to assume the roles they are entrusted with. The purpose here is to offer a new way to think about the development of the professional engineering educator. The paper focuses on:(i) the cognitive processes that faculty would tend to follow as they learn more about teaching, (ii) the discipline-based industrial/practical experience they need to acquire to add to their repertoire as “practitioners”, and (iii) the institutional initiatives, including: administrative support, and resources. What is needed is a change in culture within the institution, i.e., the department or college, to generate a comprehensive integrated set of components: articulated expectations, a reward system aligned with expectations, and opportunities for professional development to occur. Ultimately, to identify what educators and their institutions can do to generate more powerful and responsive forms of education that improves the quality of student learning.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

On Becoming a 21st Century Engineering Educator: Building Competencies and Acquiring Needed Skills

Chicago, Illinois

The paper explores ways to effective professional development of junior engineering educators, to enable them to assume the roles they are entrusted with. The purpose here is to offer a new way to think about the development of the professional engineering educator. The paper focuses on:(i) the cognitive processes that faculty would tend to follow as they learn more about teaching, (ii) the discipline-based industrial/practical experience they need to acquire to add to their repertoire as “practitioners”, and (iii) the institutional initiatives, including: administrative support, and resources. What is needed is a change in culture within the institution, i.e., the department or college, to generate a comprehensive integrated set of components: articulated expectations, a reward system aligned with expectations, and opportunities for professional development to occur. Ultimately, to identify what educators and their institutions can do to generate more powerful and responsive forms of education that improves the quality of student learning.