Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

The City Creek Center urban redevelopment project in Salt Lake City, Utah involved excavations up to 65 feet deep. Shoring systems included more than 29,000 square feet of anchored diaphragm walls, 100,000 square feet of soil nail walls, and 860 linear feet of underpinning. Detailed performance monitoring alerted the project team to unacceptable performance of an anchored diaphragm wall adjacent to an occupied twenty-five-story building on shallow foundations. This knowledge allowed the team to react quickly, stabilize the excavation, investigate the situation, and develop successful remedial measures. The diaphragm wall was reinforced with additional anchors and subgrade concrete struts, allowing the excavation to proceed with minimal delay and no damage to the adjacent building.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Case History — Performance Monitoring Success

Chicago, Illinois

The City Creek Center urban redevelopment project in Salt Lake City, Utah involved excavations up to 65 feet deep. Shoring systems included more than 29,000 square feet of anchored diaphragm walls, 100,000 square feet of soil nail walls, and 860 linear feet of underpinning. Detailed performance monitoring alerted the project team to unacceptable performance of an anchored diaphragm wall adjacent to an occupied twenty-five-story building on shallow foundations. This knowledge allowed the team to react quickly, stabilize the excavation, investigate the situation, and develop successful remedial measures. The diaphragm wall was reinforced with additional anchors and subgrade concrete struts, allowing the excavation to proceed with minimal delay and no damage to the adjacent building.