Location

Arlington, Virginia

Session Start Date

8-11-2008

Session End Date

8-16-2008

Abstract

The paper summarizes settlement records taken over periods of weeks and up to 45 years on above ground steel storage tanks 20 m to 50 m in diameter, 14 m to 20 m high, founded on fine-grained glacial tills. Soil information for each of the tanks is provided from different sources such as conventional boreholes, test pits, and sometimes Dilatometer tests. Three newly constructed tanks have been instrumented with piezometers and a tank base hydraulic profiler for monitoring during hydrotesting. The presented long-term settlements for the older tanks, and the short-term monitoring data collected from the hydrotested tanks are examined and commented on with respect to the face value of the records. The ability to apply practical geotechnical engineering methods to provide reasonable predictions of the behavior of tank foundations is also discussed.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Sixth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

8-11-2008

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2008 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Aug 11th, 12:00 AM Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

On Short-Term and Long-Term Behavior of Large Diameter above Ground Steel Storage Tanks Founded on Glacial Tills

Arlington, Virginia

The paper summarizes settlement records taken over periods of weeks and up to 45 years on above ground steel storage tanks 20 m to 50 m in diameter, 14 m to 20 m high, founded on fine-grained glacial tills. Soil information for each of the tanks is provided from different sources such as conventional boreholes, test pits, and sometimes Dilatometer tests. Three newly constructed tanks have been instrumented with piezometers and a tank base hydraulic profiler for monitoring during hydrotesting. The presented long-term settlements for the older tanks, and the short-term monitoring data collected from the hydrotested tanks are examined and commented on with respect to the face value of the records. The ability to apply practical geotechnical engineering methods to provide reasonable predictions of the behavior of tank foundations is also discussed.