Location

Arlington, Virginia

Session Start Date

8-11-2008

Session End Date

8-16-2008

Abstract

Loyola College in Maryland is a land-locked University in dire need of increasing its academic space. Working with the Baltimore Development Corporation, Loyola purchased a 52-acre parcel of land within miles of their campus which consisted of three closed landfills. The site was Loyola’s preferred location to construct a state-of-the-art athletic complex because moving their athletic facilities to an off-campus location would allow the expansion of their academic space. The athletic complex includes a home game field for lacrosse and soccer, two practice fields, administrative and maintenance buildings, stadium, and supporting infrastructure. Filling at the three landfills began in 1930 and continued on and off until 1985. Landfill materials consist of construction debris, municipal solid waste (MSW), flyash and white goods. Landfill thicknesses range from approximately 60 ft to 190 ft. in the development area. This paper describes the design and implementation of geotechnical systems to overcome the challenges of building a sports complex on the closed landfills. These systems include grade separation structures, ground improvement, utility protection, and geotechnical instrumentation. This paper will discuss landfill material properties and the design methodology associated with each of these systems.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Sixth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

8-11-2008

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2008 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Aug 11th, 12:00 AM Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

Redevelopment of a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill: Engineering Design Challenges

Arlington, Virginia

Loyola College in Maryland is a land-locked University in dire need of increasing its academic space. Working with the Baltimore Development Corporation, Loyola purchased a 52-acre parcel of land within miles of their campus which consisted of three closed landfills. The site was Loyola’s preferred location to construct a state-of-the-art athletic complex because moving their athletic facilities to an off-campus location would allow the expansion of their academic space. The athletic complex includes a home game field for lacrosse and soccer, two practice fields, administrative and maintenance buildings, stadium, and supporting infrastructure. Filling at the three landfills began in 1930 and continued on and off until 1985. Landfill materials consist of construction debris, municipal solid waste (MSW), flyash and white goods. Landfill thicknesses range from approximately 60 ft to 190 ft. in the development area. This paper describes the design and implementation of geotechnical systems to overcome the challenges of building a sports complex on the closed landfills. These systems include grade separation structures, ground improvement, utility protection, and geotechnical instrumentation. This paper will discuss landfill material properties and the design methodology associated with each of these systems.