Location

Arlington, Virginia

Session Start Date

8-11-2008

Session End Date

8-16-2008

Abstract

Bioengineering including native vegetation is an ancient method of improving the stability of slopes. In modern railway engineering, this technique is re-captured for increasing the soil stiffness and shear strength of sub-grade beneath rail tracks. A mathematical model for the rate of root water uptake has been developed considering ground conditions, type of vegetation and climatic parameters. The three independent features in the root water uptake model considered in detail are soil suction, root distribution, and potential transpiration. In order to establish a rigorous analysis for estimating the actual transpiration or root water uptake, the above mentioned factors have been quantified through relevant equations to develop the model. A two dimensional finite element approach has been employed to solve the transient coupled flow and deformation equations. In order to validate the model, an array of field measurements conducted at Miram site in Victoria, Australia and the data have been compared with the numerical predictions. The predicted results calculated using the soil, plant, and atmospheric parameters contained in the numerical model, compared favourably with the field and the associated laboratory measurements, justifying the assumptions upon which the model has been developed.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Sixth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

8-11-2008

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2008 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Case Study on the Influence of Transpiration on the Ground Behaviour

Arlington, Virginia

Bioengineering including native vegetation is an ancient method of improving the stability of slopes. In modern railway engineering, this technique is re-captured for increasing the soil stiffness and shear strength of sub-grade beneath rail tracks. A mathematical model for the rate of root water uptake has been developed considering ground conditions, type of vegetation and climatic parameters. The three independent features in the root water uptake model considered in detail are soil suction, root distribution, and potential transpiration. In order to establish a rigorous analysis for estimating the actual transpiration or root water uptake, the above mentioned factors have been quantified through relevant equations to develop the model. A two dimensional finite element approach has been employed to solve the transient coupled flow and deformation equations. In order to validate the model, an array of field measurements conducted at Miram site in Victoria, Australia and the data have been compared with the numerical predictions. The predicted results calculated using the soil, plant, and atmospheric parameters contained in the numerical model, compared favourably with the field and the associated laboratory measurements, justifying the assumptions upon which the model has been developed.