Location

Arlington, Virginia

Session Start Date

8-11-2008

Session End Date

8-16-2008

Abstract

Current practice for assessing liquefaction potential of granular soils depends heavily on in situ indices of density, and sometimes direct measurements of density. Correlations have been developed to predict resistance to liquefaction as a function of standard penetration test (SPT) blow count, cone penetrometer (CPT) tip resistance, shear-wave velocity (VS), or other index property. Recognizing that each correlation entails its own uncertainties, and that different indices of liquefaction potential may provide conflicting conclusions, the Bureau of Reclamation reviewed in situ test results from a large number of sites where multiple tests had been used. The goals were to 1) evaluate consistency among the various indices of liquefaction potential, 2) compare indirect indices of density, such as penetration resistance, against actual density measurements, and 3) survey current practice throughout the industry. This paper will provide a summary of the results.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Sixth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

8-11-2008

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2008 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Aug 11th, 12:00 AM Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

Review of In Situ Measurements as Indications of Liquefaction Potential at Numerous Sites

Arlington, Virginia

Current practice for assessing liquefaction potential of granular soils depends heavily on in situ indices of density, and sometimes direct measurements of density. Correlations have been developed to predict resistance to liquefaction as a function of standard penetration test (SPT) blow count, cone penetrometer (CPT) tip resistance, shear-wave velocity (VS), or other index property. Recognizing that each correlation entails its own uncertainties, and that different indices of liquefaction potential may provide conflicting conclusions, the Bureau of Reclamation reviewed in situ test results from a large number of sites where multiple tests had been used. The goals were to 1) evaluate consistency among the various indices of liquefaction potential, 2) compare indirect indices of density, such as penetration resistance, against actual density measurements, and 3) survey current practice throughout the industry. This paper will provide a summary of the results.