Location

Arlington, Virginia

Session Start Date

8-11-2008

Session End Date

8-16-2008

Abstract

Water front structures have suffered significant damage in many of the recent earthquakes. One of the primary causes for the poor performance of these classes of structures is the liquefaction of the foundation soil and in some instances liquefaction of the backfill soil. The liquefaction of the soil in-front of the quay wall tends to cause large lateral displacements and rotation of the wall. Full or partial liquefaction of the backfill can result in the increase of lateral earth pressure exerted on the wall that can cause additional lateral displacement of the wall. In this paper numerical analyses of a gravity wall type water front structure will be considered. Often such gravity walls are placed on rubble mound that is deposited onto the sea bed. The problem will be based on a generic model although the simplifications in the generic model were derived based on observed failures of quay walls following the 1995 Kobe earthquake. The paper presents finite element analyses of such a problem in which strength degradation of the foundation soil and the backfill material will be modelled using PZ mark III constitutive relationship. At the Port and Airport Research Institute (PARI) in Japan the possibility of using tyre chips from used car tyres as the backfill material is being researched using 1G underwater shaking table and dynamic centrifuge modelling. The finite element analyses will be repeated by including a zone of backfill consisting of the tyre chips. The properties of this material will be derived from the element tests carried out at PARI. Finally the results from the analyses of the gravity wall founded rubble mound with liquefiable foundation soil and backfill will be compared to those with tyre chip backfill. The improvement in the performance of the wall in terms of decreased lateral displacements and/or reduction in the rotation suffered by the wall will be compared.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Sixth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

8-11-2008

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2008 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Aug 11th, 12:00 AM Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

Seismic Behaviour of Water Front Structures with Tyre Chip Backfill

Arlington, Virginia

Water front structures have suffered significant damage in many of the recent earthquakes. One of the primary causes for the poor performance of these classes of structures is the liquefaction of the foundation soil and in some instances liquefaction of the backfill soil. The liquefaction of the soil in-front of the quay wall tends to cause large lateral displacements and rotation of the wall. Full or partial liquefaction of the backfill can result in the increase of lateral earth pressure exerted on the wall that can cause additional lateral displacement of the wall. In this paper numerical analyses of a gravity wall type water front structure will be considered. Often such gravity walls are placed on rubble mound that is deposited onto the sea bed. The problem will be based on a generic model although the simplifications in the generic model were derived based on observed failures of quay walls following the 1995 Kobe earthquake. The paper presents finite element analyses of such a problem in which strength degradation of the foundation soil and the backfill material will be modelled using PZ mark III constitutive relationship. At the Port and Airport Research Institute (PARI) in Japan the possibility of using tyre chips from used car tyres as the backfill material is being researched using 1G underwater shaking table and dynamic centrifuge modelling. The finite element analyses will be repeated by including a zone of backfill consisting of the tyre chips. The properties of this material will be derived from the element tests carried out at PARI. Finally the results from the analyses of the gravity wall founded rubble mound with liquefiable foundation soil and backfill will be compared to those with tyre chip backfill. The improvement in the performance of the wall in terms of decreased lateral displacements and/or reduction in the rotation suffered by the wall will be compared.