Location

Arlington, Virginia

Session Start Date

8-11-2008

Session End Date

8-16-2008

Abstract

This paper focuses on the description, analysis and stabilization of a failed cut slope in schist. The slope is located near the top of a hill and was cut for the needs of a new industrial building. A few weeks after the excavation, a slide occurred along the schistosity plane of the slope. The slide was attributed to the effect of water which flooded the slope following an overflow of a water tank located a few meters above the slope crest. For the analysis both the deterministic and probabilistic approaches were carried out, with the input parameters determined from simple in-situ and laboratory tests and also from back-analysis. The results showed that the probabilistic approach offers significant advantages, providing a better feeling of the effect of the uncertainty and variability of the input parameters and in this case a more economical solution, given that a risk of failure equal to 2.25% is acceptable.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Sixth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

8-11-2008

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2008 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Aug 11th, 12:00 AM Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

Analysis and Stabilization of a Failed Cut Slope in Schist

Arlington, Virginia

This paper focuses on the description, analysis and stabilization of a failed cut slope in schist. The slope is located near the top of a hill and was cut for the needs of a new industrial building. A few weeks after the excavation, a slide occurred along the schistosity plane of the slope. The slide was attributed to the effect of water which flooded the slope following an overflow of a water tank located a few meters above the slope crest. For the analysis both the deterministic and probabilistic approaches were carried out, with the input parameters determined from simple in-situ and laboratory tests and also from back-analysis. The results showed that the probabilistic approach offers significant advantages, providing a better feeling of the effect of the uncertainty and variability of the input parameters and in this case a more economical solution, given that a risk of failure equal to 2.25% is acceptable.