Location

Arlington, Virginia

Session Start Date

8-11-2008

Session End Date

8-16-2008

Abstract

Soil nailing is a technique routinely used in Hong Kong whereby closely spaced steel bars are installed into a slope so that its stability conditions can be improved. A full-scale field test has been carried out by The Department of Civil Engineering of The University of Hong Kong to study the development of passive load along the full length of soil nails when subjected to induced rise in groundwater table. The cut slope was formed to a very steep angle of 55° and 10 m high in completely decomposed volcanic material. Grouted curtain was also formed behind, at the bottom and on both ends of the slope in order to form an impermeable barrier that would allow groundwater table to increase artificially by injecting water into slotted PVC pipes. Nine number of soil nails (in regular 2 m c/c spacing of 3 rows and 3 columns) of 6 m long high yield steel bar were installed at 15° from horizontal into the formed cut slope. Instrumentation included strain gauges along the nails, inclinometers, piezometers, and settlement prisms. This paper describes the method of construction and the load developed along the soil nails when the groundwater table was raised to the ground surface. It was found that the measured passive load along the soil nail was smaller than the commonly assumed design parameters, an indication that substantial savings can be achieved if mobilization of shearing resistance along the full length of the soil nail was considered in routine design. Finite element analysis has also been carried out to compare the measured load with the simulated load and the stability factor is compared with the factor of safety at each stage of loading.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Sixth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

8-11-2008

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2008 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Aug 11th, 12:00 AM Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

A Field Test Study on Instrumented Soil Nail Installed in Cut Slope

Arlington, Virginia

Soil nailing is a technique routinely used in Hong Kong whereby closely spaced steel bars are installed into a slope so that its stability conditions can be improved. A full-scale field test has been carried out by The Department of Civil Engineering of The University of Hong Kong to study the development of passive load along the full length of soil nails when subjected to induced rise in groundwater table. The cut slope was formed to a very steep angle of 55° and 10 m high in completely decomposed volcanic material. Grouted curtain was also formed behind, at the bottom and on both ends of the slope in order to form an impermeable barrier that would allow groundwater table to increase artificially by injecting water into slotted PVC pipes. Nine number of soil nails (in regular 2 m c/c spacing of 3 rows and 3 columns) of 6 m long high yield steel bar were installed at 15° from horizontal into the formed cut slope. Instrumentation included strain gauges along the nails, inclinometers, piezometers, and settlement prisms. This paper describes the method of construction and the load developed along the soil nails when the groundwater table was raised to the ground surface. It was found that the measured passive load along the soil nail was smaller than the commonly assumed design parameters, an indication that substantial savings can be achieved if mobilization of shearing resistance along the full length of the soil nail was considered in routine design. Finite element analysis has also been carried out to compare the measured load with the simulated load and the stability factor is compared with the factor of safety at each stage of loading.