Location

Arlington, Virginia

Session Start Date

8-11-2008

Session End Date

8-16-2008

Abstract

The adoption of design motions with a 2% rate of exceedance in 50 years in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC 2005) has had a major impact on geotechnical engineering practice in Canada. The peak ground accelerations were doubled compared with the previous motions which had an exceedance rate of 10% in 50 years. The increase in accelerations has had a huge effect on assessments of liquefaction potential and slope stability, because the methods of assessment in common use depend on peak ground acceleration. This paper describes typical problems encountered in Canadian practice with use of the low probability motions and describes some measures for alleviating the impact on design, while maintaining the code objective of life safety.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Sixth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

8-11-2008

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2008 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Aug 11th, 12:00 AM Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

The Impact of Low Probability Ground Motions on Canadian Geotechnical Engineering Practice

Arlington, Virginia

The adoption of design motions with a 2% rate of exceedance in 50 years in the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC 2005) has had a major impact on geotechnical engineering practice in Canada. The peak ground accelerations were doubled compared with the previous motions which had an exceedance rate of 10% in 50 years. The increase in accelerations has had a huge effect on assessments of liquefaction potential and slope stability, because the methods of assessment in common use depend on peak ground acceleration. This paper describes typical problems encountered in Canadian practice with use of the low probability motions and describes some measures for alleviating the impact on design, while maintaining the code objective of life safety.