Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

Liquefaction has typically been mitigated by in-situ densification; however vertical composite drains offer the possibility of preventing liquefaction and associated settlement while reducing the cost and time required for treatment. Three case histories are presented which describe the use of vertical drains to mitigate liquefaction hazard and techniques to control the flow of water exiting the drains. In addition, results from a test case are presented where controlled blasting techniques were used to evaluate drain performance in-situ. Blasting was successful in liquefying loose sand in an untreated test site. Similar blast charges were then detonated at adjacent sites treated with drains. Measurements demonstrated that the drains significantly increased the rate of pore pressure dissipation. In addition, the installation process typically densified the surrounding soil, thereby decreasing the liquefaction potential. Computer analyses successfully matched the measured response and suggest that the drains could be effective for earthquake events.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Liquefaction Hazard Mitigation by Prefabricated Vertical Drains

New York, New York

Liquefaction has typically been mitigated by in-situ densification; however vertical composite drains offer the possibility of preventing liquefaction and associated settlement while reducing the cost and time required for treatment. Three case histories are presented which describe the use of vertical drains to mitigate liquefaction hazard and techniques to control the flow of water exiting the drains. In addition, results from a test case are presented where controlled blasting techniques were used to evaluate drain performance in-situ. Blasting was successful in liquefying loose sand in an untreated test site. Similar blast charges were then detonated at adjacent sites treated with drains. Measurements demonstrated that the drains significantly increased the rate of pore pressure dissipation. In addition, the installation process typically densified the surrounding soil, thereby decreasing the liquefaction potential. Computer analyses successfully matched the measured response and suggest that the drains could be effective for earthquake events.