Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

In this paper the results of a series of dynamic centrifuge tests are reported. These tests were performed on different types of soil stratifications supporting a nuclear containment structure. Test results indicate that accelerations transmitted to the structure base are dependent on the stiffness degradation of the supporting soil. It is also conclusively shown that even partial liquefaction can be dangerous and the structure can tilt and rotate. Steady build up of excess pore pressure leads to softening of the soil, which decreases the shear modulus and shear strength and subsequently changes the dynamic responses. The characteristic frequency of the soil deposit gradually decreases to values that are closer to the natural frequency of the deposit. The presence of the structure reduces the translational component of the input base motion and induces rocking of the structure. Thus it can be concluded that rigid structures may not be as safe as believed.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Centrifuge Modelling of Dynamic Soil Structure Interaction in Layered and Inhomogeneous Liquefiable Soil

New York, New York

In this paper the results of a series of dynamic centrifuge tests are reported. These tests were performed on different types of soil stratifications supporting a nuclear containment structure. Test results indicate that accelerations transmitted to the structure base are dependent on the stiffness degradation of the supporting soil. It is also conclusively shown that even partial liquefaction can be dangerous and the structure can tilt and rotate. Steady build up of excess pore pressure leads to softening of the soil, which decreases the shear modulus and shear strength and subsequently changes the dynamic responses. The characteristic frequency of the soil deposit gradually decreases to values that are closer to the natural frequency of the deposit. The presence of the structure reduces the translational component of the input base motion and induces rocking of the structure. Thus it can be concluded that rigid structures may not be as safe as believed.