Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

For the first time in Virginia highway construction history, a consortium of contractors, engineers, and designers proposed an expansion of the VA-288 highway around the fast-growing western half of Richmond. The design-build project was approved in December 2000 and construction began April 2001. The project includes constructing approximately 17 miles of new highway with 23 bridges and overpasses. The fast-track, design-build process requires that bridge design and construction be carefully evaluated to determine the most cost-effective approach. Figure 1 presents the Site Location Map. In keeping with the design-build process, the bridge foundations were varied depending upon the crossing’s length and the bridge’s height. Many smaller bridges were supported on pile foundations, while larger structures were designed with a combination of piles and drilled shafts. To ensure cost-effective foundations, it was desirable to use the highest loading possible without compromising safety. This required extensive foundation testing using non-destructive techniques. Testing with the Pile Driving Analyzer (PDA) was proposed for driven-pile foundations to confirm the ultimate pile capacity, evaluate driving stresses and hammer performance, and establish the driving criteria. PDA testing was performed at all bridge locations where piles were used. CAPWAP and GRLWEAP analysis were used to establish the pile-driving criteria, which allowed the most efficient means available for pile installations. Finally, PDA testing and evaluations were used to further evaluate the pile performance and suitability whenever unusual situations were encountered. Crosshole Sonic Logging (CSL) and Pile Integrity Tests (PIT) were used to evaluate the overall quality of the constructed shafts for drilled-shaft foundations. CSL using the Crosshole Analyzer (CHA) was performed on each of the project’s 120 shafts. The shaft diameter varied from 4.0 to 6.5 feet, with design loads between 600 and more than 2,500 kips. Remedial actions were developed and implemented to repair the defect as necessary where CSL results indicated poor quality concrete or defects in the shaft. This paper presents a case history detailing the benefits of the latest techniques for deep-foundation evaluation, various construction anomalies, and defects encountered while testing the drilled shafts. The paper also discusses the remedial measures developed and implemented to repair the defects.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Case History: Foundation Evaluation for the Virginia Highway 288 Project

New York, New York

For the first time in Virginia highway construction history, a consortium of contractors, engineers, and designers proposed an expansion of the VA-288 highway around the fast-growing western half of Richmond. The design-build project was approved in December 2000 and construction began April 2001. The project includes constructing approximately 17 miles of new highway with 23 bridges and overpasses. The fast-track, design-build process requires that bridge design and construction be carefully evaluated to determine the most cost-effective approach. Figure 1 presents the Site Location Map. In keeping with the design-build process, the bridge foundations were varied depending upon the crossing’s length and the bridge’s height. Many smaller bridges were supported on pile foundations, while larger structures were designed with a combination of piles and drilled shafts. To ensure cost-effective foundations, it was desirable to use the highest loading possible without compromising safety. This required extensive foundation testing using non-destructive techniques. Testing with the Pile Driving Analyzer (PDA) was proposed for driven-pile foundations to confirm the ultimate pile capacity, evaluate driving stresses and hammer performance, and establish the driving criteria. PDA testing was performed at all bridge locations where piles were used. CAPWAP and GRLWEAP analysis were used to establish the pile-driving criteria, which allowed the most efficient means available for pile installations. Finally, PDA testing and evaluations were used to further evaluate the pile performance and suitability whenever unusual situations were encountered. Crosshole Sonic Logging (CSL) and Pile Integrity Tests (PIT) were used to evaluate the overall quality of the constructed shafts for drilled-shaft foundations. CSL using the Crosshole Analyzer (CHA) was performed on each of the project’s 120 shafts. The shaft diameter varied from 4.0 to 6.5 feet, with design loads between 600 and more than 2,500 kips. Remedial actions were developed and implemented to repair the defect as necessary where CSL results indicated poor quality concrete or defects in the shaft. This paper presents a case history detailing the benefits of the latest techniques for deep-foundation evaluation, various construction anomalies, and defects encountered while testing the drilled shafts. The paper also discusses the remedial measures developed and implemented to repair the defects.