Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

Non-destructive testing of piles has gained increased acceptance for various purposes, e.g., quality control/quality assurance, verification of existing conditions, and quantification of dimensions. The correct use of this technique can greatly simplify and expedite investigation, and be economical in addressing concerns or questions on pile conditions. Equally, its incorrect use can cause controversies, delays, and/or create adverse reputation for the technology. This paper presents three case histories on the use of the low strain, pile integrity testing (PIT) for different pile types and for different reasons. In this paper, the term “pile” is used generically and implies all types of deep foundations, e.g., driven or drilled-in, concrete or steel, piles or piers, etc. Initially, a brief overview of the technology along with its capabilities and limitations will be presented, followed by the case histories. The first case is related to the construction of a new power plant at the location of existing pile-supported buildings, necessitating the collection of information on the condition and length of these piles so that they can be used as part of the new foundations for the power plant once the existing buildings were demolished. The second case history is related to the construction of a hotel, involving augered cast-in-place piles. PIT was performed to evaluate the condition of a failing test pile as part of the quality control process. The third case history is related to investigating the quality of several drilled shafts for a retail facility. PIT was performed to obtain an estimate of the shaft lengths and gather information on overall shaft quality. The case histories will provide details of structures, their foundations, and the PIT application. Along with the PIT results, other relevant information such as subsurface conditions and pile load test results will be presented, where available. The collected PIT data will be compared with pile information available prior to initiating the program to assess the validity and the applicability of the PIT technique.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Non-Destructive Testing of Piles Using the Low Strain Integrity Method

New York, New York

Non-destructive testing of piles has gained increased acceptance for various purposes, e.g., quality control/quality assurance, verification of existing conditions, and quantification of dimensions. The correct use of this technique can greatly simplify and expedite investigation, and be economical in addressing concerns or questions on pile conditions. Equally, its incorrect use can cause controversies, delays, and/or create adverse reputation for the technology. This paper presents three case histories on the use of the low strain, pile integrity testing (PIT) for different pile types and for different reasons. In this paper, the term “pile” is used generically and implies all types of deep foundations, e.g., driven or drilled-in, concrete or steel, piles or piers, etc. Initially, a brief overview of the technology along with its capabilities and limitations will be presented, followed by the case histories. The first case is related to the construction of a new power plant at the location of existing pile-supported buildings, necessitating the collection of information on the condition and length of these piles so that they can be used as part of the new foundations for the power plant once the existing buildings were demolished. The second case history is related to the construction of a hotel, involving augered cast-in-place piles. PIT was performed to evaluate the condition of a failing test pile as part of the quality control process. The third case history is related to investigating the quality of several drilled shafts for a retail facility. PIT was performed to obtain an estimate of the shaft lengths and gather information on overall shaft quality. The case histories will provide details of structures, their foundations, and the PIT application. Along with the PIT results, other relevant information such as subsurface conditions and pile load test results will be presented, where available. The collected PIT data will be compared with pile information available prior to initiating the program to assess the validity and the applicability of the PIT technique.