Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

A new cable-stayed bridge for US Highway 17 is currently under construction over the Cooper River between Mount Pleasant and Charleston, South Carolina. This new bridge will replace two existing structures, the Silas Pearlman and the Grace Memorial Bridges. When completed, the new bridge will have a 1,546 feet span over the Cooper River, making this bridge the longest cable-stayed span in North America. The foundations for this replacement bridge are drilled shafts embedded within the Cooper Marl formation, which underlies the near surface lower coastal plain soil deposits. Depending on the location within the bridge structure, the drilled shafts range from 1.07m (3.5ft) to 3.66m (12ft) in diameter with embedments of up to 56.4m (185ft) within the Cooper Marl. The deepest drilled shafts extend to depths of 71.3m (234ft) from mean sea level (MSL). A total of 410 drilled shafts will be used as the foundations for the new bridge. At of the time of submittal of this publication, a total of 384 of these drilled shafts were installed over a time period ranging fromMarch 2002 to September 2003. The design of the bridge left little redundancy in the drilled shaft foundations. Therefore, integrity testing of the drilled shafts, especially at critical areas such as the main bridge piers, was of major importance to verify that these foundations were capable of supporting the bridge superstructure. Crosshole Sonic Logging (CSL) was selected as the primary testing method to evaluate drilled shaft integrity. This paper presents the results of the drilled shaft CSL integrity testing and discusses the findings of the testing and lessons learned over the course of drilled shaft installation.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Crosshole Sonic Logging Integrity Testing for the New Cooper River Bridge

New York, New York

A new cable-stayed bridge for US Highway 17 is currently under construction over the Cooper River between Mount Pleasant and Charleston, South Carolina. This new bridge will replace two existing structures, the Silas Pearlman and the Grace Memorial Bridges. When completed, the new bridge will have a 1,546 feet span over the Cooper River, making this bridge the longest cable-stayed span in North America. The foundations for this replacement bridge are drilled shafts embedded within the Cooper Marl formation, which underlies the near surface lower coastal plain soil deposits. Depending on the location within the bridge structure, the drilled shafts range from 1.07m (3.5ft) to 3.66m (12ft) in diameter with embedments of up to 56.4m (185ft) within the Cooper Marl. The deepest drilled shafts extend to depths of 71.3m (234ft) from mean sea level (MSL). A total of 410 drilled shafts will be used as the foundations for the new bridge. At of the time of submittal of this publication, a total of 384 of these drilled shafts were installed over a time period ranging fromMarch 2002 to September 2003. The design of the bridge left little redundancy in the drilled shaft foundations. Therefore, integrity testing of the drilled shafts, especially at critical areas such as the main bridge piers, was of major importance to verify that these foundations were capable of supporting the bridge superstructure. Crosshole Sonic Logging (CSL) was selected as the primary testing method to evaluate drilled shaft integrity. This paper presents the results of the drilled shaft CSL integrity testing and discusses the findings of the testing and lessons learned over the course of drilled shaft installation.