Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

The Cement Deep Soil Mixing (CDSM) method is an in situ soil treatment technology that introduces and mixes cementitious materials with native soils using hollow-stem rotating shafts equipped with a cutting tool at the tip and mixing paddles above the tip. The successful use of the soil-cement produced by CDSM relies on the selection of acceptance criteria and construction quality control during the in situ soil mixing process. Two CDSM projects for the Port of Oakland are used as case examples to present the acceptance criteria set and the execution of the quality control program for the soil mixing work. This quality control program ensures that the geometric and material design parameters of the CDSM structure have been obtained. The data acquired from these two projects are presented and compared with strength data from two other projects to illustrate the influence of acceptance criteria over the CDSM products.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Quality Control of Cement Deep Soil Mixing Work for the Port of Oakland Projects

New York, New York

The Cement Deep Soil Mixing (CDSM) method is an in situ soil treatment technology that introduces and mixes cementitious materials with native soils using hollow-stem rotating shafts equipped with a cutting tool at the tip and mixing paddles above the tip. The successful use of the soil-cement produced by CDSM relies on the selection of acceptance criteria and construction quality control during the in situ soil mixing process. Two CDSM projects for the Port of Oakland are used as case examples to present the acceptance criteria set and the execution of the quality control program for the soil mixing work. This quality control program ensures that the geometric and material design parameters of the CDSM structure have been obtained. The data acquired from these two projects are presented and compared with strength data from two other projects to illustrate the influence of acceptance criteria over the CDSM products.