Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

The deep mixing method (DMM), by which, soil and cement are blended together in situ to form soil-cement columns, is used throughout the world. In this paper, load transfer behavior of cement-soil columns was performed by full-scale load tests in situ. By developing Chin’s method (Chin, 1970), a method is presented to estimate the pile ultimate capacity based on the load to settlement curve of pile static load test. The measured results showed that the strain near the pile tip was small. The major deformation of the pile is in the range of 0 to the effective length, beyond which the strain of the pile is less than 10%. The increase of the load mainly affected the deformation of the pile within the range of 0 to lc, but hardly over lc.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Load Transfer of Cement-Soil Column by Full Scale Load Test in Soft Clay

New York, New York

The deep mixing method (DMM), by which, soil and cement are blended together in situ to form soil-cement columns, is used throughout the world. In this paper, load transfer behavior of cement-soil columns was performed by full-scale load tests in situ. By developing Chin’s method (Chin, 1970), a method is presented to estimate the pile ultimate capacity based on the load to settlement curve of pile static load test. The measured results showed that the strain near the pile tip was small. The major deformation of the pile is in the range of 0 to the effective length, beyond which the strain of the pile is less than 10%. The increase of the load mainly affected the deformation of the pile within the range of 0 to lc, but hardly over lc.