Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

Erskine Street Interchange is a new roadway interchange constructed in Brooklyn, New York in 2002. Challenges addressed in construction of the interchange included poor foundation conditions, such as the presence of hydraulic sand fill, a weak cohesive deposit, an approximately 30-year old municipal waste landfill beneath portions of the abutment ramps, and the presence of one of the most important commuter roadways in Brooklyn and Queens, the Belt Parkway, immediately adjacent to the construction site. How these challenges are addressed in the final design and construction of the Erskine Street Interchange will be discussed. The design consists of on grade ramps approaching a pile supported abutment. A ground improvement program, including deep dynamic compact, soil surcharge and use of geogrids was implemented. The quality control measures used to verify soil performance and protect the adjacent parkway, and long term monitoring and performance of the embankments will also be addressed.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Erskine Street Interchange

New York, New York

Erskine Street Interchange is a new roadway interchange constructed in Brooklyn, New York in 2002. Challenges addressed in construction of the interchange included poor foundation conditions, such as the presence of hydraulic sand fill, a weak cohesive deposit, an approximately 30-year old municipal waste landfill beneath portions of the abutment ramps, and the presence of one of the most important commuter roadways in Brooklyn and Queens, the Belt Parkway, immediately adjacent to the construction site. How these challenges are addressed in the final design and construction of the Erskine Street Interchange will be discussed. The design consists of on grade ramps approaching a pile supported abutment. A ground improvement program, including deep dynamic compact, soil surcharge and use of geogrids was implemented. The quality control measures used to verify soil performance and protect the adjacent parkway, and long term monitoring and performance of the embankments will also be addressed.