Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

This paper describes the geotechnical experience gained over the last 25 years at a 21-square kilometers waterfront development along the east coast of Doha city, Qatar. The development process involved filling a shallow bay using approximately 53 million cubic meters of calcareous sand with gravel and limestone fragments, making it one of the largest land reclamation projects in the world. The 2 to 3-meter-high filling was placed on natural seabed deposits that typically consist of a 1.0 m to 1.25 m top layer of soft plastic silt followed by an approximately 3.5 meters of loose to medium sand and an extended layer of weathered limestone. The subsurface layers that posed engineering problems such as excessive settlement to constructions in the filled area were primarily the soft plastic silt and loose sand. Field and laboratory tests conducted before and after filling showed a significant soil improvement due to fill loading and the consequent soil aging. This is attributed to primary and secondary consolidation of plastic silt and secondary compression of sand. Settlement analysis considering this improvement has led to the use of shallow foundations for low-rise and relatively high-rise structures changing the general practice of overusing the costly and time-consuming deep foundations and soil replacement.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Large-Scale Land Reclamation and Soil Improvement for a City Expansion

New York, New York

This paper describes the geotechnical experience gained over the last 25 years at a 21-square kilometers waterfront development along the east coast of Doha city, Qatar. The development process involved filling a shallow bay using approximately 53 million cubic meters of calcareous sand with gravel and limestone fragments, making it one of the largest land reclamation projects in the world. The 2 to 3-meter-high filling was placed on natural seabed deposits that typically consist of a 1.0 m to 1.25 m top layer of soft plastic silt followed by an approximately 3.5 meters of loose to medium sand and an extended layer of weathered limestone. The subsurface layers that posed engineering problems such as excessive settlement to constructions in the filled area were primarily the soft plastic silt and loose sand. Field and laboratory tests conducted before and after filling showed a significant soil improvement due to fill loading and the consequent soil aging. This is attributed to primary and secondary consolidation of plastic silt and secondary compression of sand. Settlement analysis considering this improvement has led to the use of shallow foundations for low-rise and relatively high-rise structures changing the general practice of overusing the costly and time-consuming deep foundations and soil replacement.