Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

An approximately 2100-ft section of Interstate 70 (I-70) experienced a series of ground failures in 1994 and 1995 that were attributed to collapse of underground mine workings. Repair of the roadway consisted of construction of barrier walls of stiff grout to contain production grout pumped into the mines. Beginning in spring 1996, depressions were noted in the pavement surface over some of the grouted holes. As a consequence, a two-part investigation was initiated to determine whether the surface expressions reflect subsurface conditions that are a risk to the travel lanes and traveling public. In Phase I, Test Area Investigation, various field and analytical methods were tested and evaluated on a small scale prior to broad-scale implementation in Phase II. Crosshole and SASW seismic wave methods of subsurface characterization were included in the Phase I investigation. The paper describes the test methods employed in the field, and documents data and test results obtained from the test area. It is shown that quality geophysical measurements can be made in close proximity to the active interstate, and that no single technique will unambiguously detect voids or other anomalies over a wide range of depths. Based upon these results, specific recommendations for the Phase II investigation are provided.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Characterization of Abandoned Mine Sites Beneath I-70 Via Crosshole and SASW Seismic Wave Methods

New York, New York

An approximately 2100-ft section of Interstate 70 (I-70) experienced a series of ground failures in 1994 and 1995 that were attributed to collapse of underground mine workings. Repair of the roadway consisted of construction of barrier walls of stiff grout to contain production grout pumped into the mines. Beginning in spring 1996, depressions were noted in the pavement surface over some of the grouted holes. As a consequence, a two-part investigation was initiated to determine whether the surface expressions reflect subsurface conditions that are a risk to the travel lanes and traveling public. In Phase I, Test Area Investigation, various field and analytical methods were tested and evaluated on a small scale prior to broad-scale implementation in Phase II. Crosshole and SASW seismic wave methods of subsurface characterization were included in the Phase I investigation. The paper describes the test methods employed in the field, and documents data and test results obtained from the test area. It is shown that quality geophysical measurements can be made in close proximity to the active interstate, and that no single technique will unambiguously detect voids or other anomalies over a wide range of depths. Based upon these results, specific recommendations for the Phase II investigation are provided.