Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

The integrity of a mine plug impounding more than 30 million gallons of acidic mine drainage water (AMD) was investigated using a combination of technologies. A two-phase investigation program was adopted which allowed the full depth of the mine plug to be explored without release of detrimental AMD. The condition of the concrete, support rock, rock/concrete interface, and drainage pipes and valves was evaluated. Phase 1 included (1) a review of plug design documents and construction data, (2) review of data from other mines on acid attack of concrete, (3) detailed visual inspections, (4) use of nondestructive testing techniques to assess the condition of the concrete, and (5) geochemical testing of seepage and drain pipe waters. Phase 2 explored uncertainties identified during Phase 1 and included (1) coring into the concrete plug and adjacent rock, (2) cross-hole sonic logging, (3) laboratory testing of concrete and rock samples, (4) operational testing of valves, and (5) measurements of the thickness of pressurized piping components. While several minor defects were detected, none were significant enough to affect the mine plug's performance. The investigation confirmed the integrity of the mine plug after 13 years of operation.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Mine Plug Integrity Evaluation

New York, New York

The integrity of a mine plug impounding more than 30 million gallons of acidic mine drainage water (AMD) was investigated using a combination of technologies. A two-phase investigation program was adopted which allowed the full depth of the mine plug to be explored without release of detrimental AMD. The condition of the concrete, support rock, rock/concrete interface, and drainage pipes and valves was evaluated. Phase 1 included (1) a review of plug design documents and construction data, (2) review of data from other mines on acid attack of concrete, (3) detailed visual inspections, (4) use of nondestructive testing techniques to assess the condition of the concrete, and (5) geochemical testing of seepage and drain pipe waters. Phase 2 explored uncertainties identified during Phase 1 and included (1) coring into the concrete plug and adjacent rock, (2) cross-hole sonic logging, (3) laboratory testing of concrete and rock samples, (4) operational testing of valves, and (5) measurements of the thickness of pressurized piping components. While several minor defects were detected, none were significant enough to affect the mine plug's performance. The investigation confirmed the integrity of the mine plug after 13 years of operation.