Alternative Title

Deep Basement Construction Through an Existing Basement at the Central Business District of Hong Kong

Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

In June 2002, a 32-storey high quality commercial building with a 3-level deep basement, namely Chater House, was completed. The Chater House site was previously occupied by the Swire House and its basement structure and foundations obstructed the construction of the new basement. Temporary pipe pile walls with grout curtain were used to facilitate local trimming/demolition of the existing basement slab and pile caps. Diaphragm walls were constructed through the locally demolished basement to retain the soils for the 15m deep excavation and the new basement was constructed by top-down construction method. In addition, the diaphragm walls and large diameter bored piles were constructed to support the vertical loads and wind shear from the superstructure. This paper describes the geotechnical design aspects of the new development. The difficulties and special issues during the substructure construction works are also discussed. Instrumentation monitoring results are also reviewed and compared with the predicted movements.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Deep Basement Construction Through an Existing Basemement at the Central Business District of Hong Kong

New York, New York

In June 2002, a 32-storey high quality commercial building with a 3-level deep basement, namely Chater House, was completed. The Chater House site was previously occupied by the Swire House and its basement structure and foundations obstructed the construction of the new basement. Temporary pipe pile walls with grout curtain were used to facilitate local trimming/demolition of the existing basement slab and pile caps. Diaphragm walls were constructed through the locally demolished basement to retain the soils for the 15m deep excavation and the new basement was constructed by top-down construction method. In addition, the diaphragm walls and large diameter bored piles were constructed to support the vertical loads and wind shear from the superstructure. This paper describes the geotechnical design aspects of the new development. The difficulties and special issues during the substructure construction works are also discussed. Instrumentation monitoring results are also reviewed and compared with the predicted movements.