Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

An excavation up to 23m deep for the Dana Farber research tower in the Longwood medical area of Boston, was supported by a permanent perimeter diaphragm wall extending into the underlying conglomerate and up to 6 levels of prestressed tiebacks anchored in the rock. The lateral earth support system was very successful in limiting wall deflections to less than ±15mm on each of the four sides of the excavation. However, ground surface settlements up to 65mm occurred on two sides and were attributed to ground losses that occurred when tiebacks were installed through overpressured sand layers at depths of 15-18m. Finite element simulations are able to describe consistently the effects of the different excavation and support sequences on each side of the project using backfigured soil properties, while surface settlements can be explained by including local ground losses within the analyses.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Control of Ground Movements for a Multi-Level-Anchored, Diaphragm Wall During Excavation

New York, New York

An excavation up to 23m deep for the Dana Farber research tower in the Longwood medical area of Boston, was supported by a permanent perimeter diaphragm wall extending into the underlying conglomerate and up to 6 levels of prestressed tiebacks anchored in the rock. The lateral earth support system was very successful in limiting wall deflections to less than ±15mm on each of the four sides of the excavation. However, ground surface settlements up to 65mm occurred on two sides and were attributed to ground losses that occurred when tiebacks were installed through overpressured sand layers at depths of 15-18m. Finite element simulations are able to describe consistently the effects of the different excavation and support sequences on each side of the project using backfigured soil properties, while surface settlements can be explained by including local ground losses within the analyses.