Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

MSE walls are widely used in site development, primarily due to their low cost when compared with conventional retaining structures; however, the costs to repair or reconstruct a poorly performing wall likely outweigh these initial savings. This paper includes a summary of three MSE walls that have experienced either a complete failure (collapse) or have undergone significant movement, adversely affecting wall performance. In each case history, the likely cause of failure and the solution for rehabilitation of the structures are presented, along with the approximate cost of repair. Several projects in which other methods of stabilization were used are also presented in limited detail. Methods of repair or stabilization are compared with regard to constructibility, cost, and their applicability to various failure mechanisms and site constraints.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

MSE Walls in Distress: Repair Them or Rebuild Them?

New York, New York

MSE walls are widely used in site development, primarily due to their low cost when compared with conventional retaining structures; however, the costs to repair or reconstruct a poorly performing wall likely outweigh these initial savings. This paper includes a summary of three MSE walls that have experienced either a complete failure (collapse) or have undergone significant movement, adversely affecting wall performance. In each case history, the likely cause of failure and the solution for rehabilitation of the structures are presented, along with the approximate cost of repair. Several projects in which other methods of stabilization were used are also presented in limited detail. Methods of repair or stabilization are compared with regard to constructibility, cost, and their applicability to various failure mechanisms and site constraints.