Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

Over the past decade, the focus of liquefaction engineering began to shift towards assessment of the consequences of liquefaction with respect to the seismic performance of engineered structures and facilities, which requires accurate and reliable tools for prediction of ground deformations over the small to moderate range. Promising new predictive tools are evolving. These include simplified, empirical tools as well as sophisticated analytical and constitutive models. Recently, a high quality laboratory testing program consisting of undrained, cyclic simple shear testing on fully-saturated samples of Monterey No. 0/30 sand was completed at U.C. Berkeley. As a result, a new semiempirical procedure was proposed for predicting post-liquefaction volumetric reconsolidation ground settlements in essentially level ground (α ≈ 0 conditions). This new procedure also includes modification for predicting liquefaction-induced ground settlement in sloping or near free-face ground (α ≠ 0 conditions). The new procedure was shown to perform well for a suite of field performance case histories with small-to-moderate ground settlements, comparing with existing semi-empirical engineering tools for estimating liquefaction-induced ground deformations.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Estimation of Liquefaction-Induced Ground Settlement (Case Studies)

New York, New York

Over the past decade, the focus of liquefaction engineering began to shift towards assessment of the consequences of liquefaction with respect to the seismic performance of engineered structures and facilities, which requires accurate and reliable tools for prediction of ground deformations over the small to moderate range. Promising new predictive tools are evolving. These include simplified, empirical tools as well as sophisticated analytical and constitutive models. Recently, a high quality laboratory testing program consisting of undrained, cyclic simple shear testing on fully-saturated samples of Monterey No. 0/30 sand was completed at U.C. Berkeley. As a result, a new semiempirical procedure was proposed for predicting post-liquefaction volumetric reconsolidation ground settlements in essentially level ground (α ≈ 0 conditions). This new procedure also includes modification for predicting liquefaction-induced ground settlement in sloping or near free-face ground (α ≠ 0 conditions). The new procedure was shown to perform well for a suite of field performance case histories with small-to-moderate ground settlements, comparing with existing semi-empirical engineering tools for estimating liquefaction-induced ground deformations.