Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

A series of cone penetration test were conducted in the southeast of Tehran to assess the liquefaction potential in this area. At the same time, after sounding of each cone penetration test, soil samples were also taken from different depths of boreholes to visually verify the soil classification. Seventy four samples from twenty boreholes were taken and their soil characteristics were obtained. To classify the soil layers, using recorded data, two various soil behaviour classification charts proposed by Robertson and Wride (1988), and Marr (1981) were examined which for some cases different results were obtained. In this paper validity of these procedures are investigated and discussed in details. These soil classification methods in some cases give a good results but there is a different between those charts and observed soil classification, particularly when the soil contain fines and therefore some modification must be applied.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Comparison of Soil Classification Methods Using CPT Results

New York, New York

A series of cone penetration test were conducted in the southeast of Tehran to assess the liquefaction potential in this area. At the same time, after sounding of each cone penetration test, soil samples were also taken from different depths of boreholes to visually verify the soil classification. Seventy four samples from twenty boreholes were taken and their soil characteristics were obtained. To classify the soil layers, using recorded data, two various soil behaviour classification charts proposed by Robertson and Wride (1988), and Marr (1981) were examined which for some cases different results were obtained. In this paper validity of these procedures are investigated and discussed in details. These soil classification methods in some cases give a good results but there is a different between those charts and observed soil classification, particularly when the soil contain fines and therefore some modification must be applied.