Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

The Mw 8.4 Southern Peru Earthquake of June 23, 2001 caused extensive damage in a widespread area in southern Peru and northern Chile, including several important population centers. Damage in some of these cities was correlated with local soil conditions and topography, suggesting the influence of local site amplification effects in damage distributions. The earthquake caused numerous instances of other types of geotechnical related ground failures, including liquefaction and lateral spreads in river valleys, seismic compression of highway fills, and slope failures. This work focuses on case histories documenting site amplification and liquefaction in the Southern Peru earthquake. Among the liquefaction events observed in this earthquake, the liquefaction of a heap-leach pad is the first reported failure of its type in a seismic event.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Observations of Site Amplification and Liquefaction in the June 23, 2001, Southern Peru Earthquake

New York, New York

The Mw 8.4 Southern Peru Earthquake of June 23, 2001 caused extensive damage in a widespread area in southern Peru and northern Chile, including several important population centers. Damage in some of these cities was correlated with local soil conditions and topography, suggesting the influence of local site amplification effects in damage distributions. The earthquake caused numerous instances of other types of geotechnical related ground failures, including liquefaction and lateral spreads in river valleys, seismic compression of highway fills, and slope failures. This work focuses on case histories documenting site amplification and liquefaction in the Southern Peru earthquake. Among the liquefaction events observed in this earthquake, the liquefaction of a heap-leach pad is the first reported failure of its type in a seismic event.