Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

The shear wave velocity of soil and rock is one of the key components in establishing the design esponse spectra, and therefore the seismic design forces, for a building, bridge, or other structure. The shear wave velocity can be measured from in-situ field tests, such as cross-hole or downhole testing. The shear wave velocity can also be estimated based on empirical correlations with other field collected information. This paper presents case histories from 8 bridge projects performed in the northeastern United States where in-situ measurements of shear wave velocities were performed for site-specific ground motion studies. A comparison of these measurements with several empirical correlations indicates that the empirical correlations do not approximate the shear wave velocity very well. Therefore, the use of the empirically derived shear wave velocities may result in an inaccurate determination of the seismic forces imparted to the soils and the structure. Therefore, based on these results, it is concluded that the use of empirically derived shear wave velocities should be used as a preliminary assessment for development of response spectra and liquefaction susceptibility parameters.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Shear Wave Velocity and Its Effect on Seismic Design Forces and Liquefaction Assessment

New York, New York

The shear wave velocity of soil and rock is one of the key components in establishing the design esponse spectra, and therefore the seismic design forces, for a building, bridge, or other structure. The shear wave velocity can be measured from in-situ field tests, such as cross-hole or downhole testing. The shear wave velocity can also be estimated based on empirical correlations with other field collected information. This paper presents case histories from 8 bridge projects performed in the northeastern United States where in-situ measurements of shear wave velocities were performed for site-specific ground motion studies. A comparison of these measurements with several empirical correlations indicates that the empirical correlations do not approximate the shear wave velocity very well. Therefore, the use of the empirically derived shear wave velocities may result in an inaccurate determination of the seismic forces imparted to the soils and the structure. Therefore, based on these results, it is concluded that the use of empirically derived shear wave velocities should be used as a preliminary assessment for development of response spectra and liquefaction susceptibility parameters.