Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

On three projects, one a class action law suit and two involving readjustment of insurance claims, we evaluated the impact of the 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge, California earthquake on over 1,600 residential properties. For each of the properties, we reviewed previous reports on the condition of the site immediately after the earthquake, undertook a site visit to observe current conditions, undertook site-specific geotechnical investigations, as appropriate, and documented our findings on the impact of long-term and earthquakerelated geotechnical factors on property damage. We have identified the following significant geotechnical factors that contribute to residential earthquake damage: (a) hillside sites; (b) cut/fill transitions; (c) expansive soils; (d) liquefied sandy soils; and (e) deep soft soils. This paper summarizes and presents our findings regarding these factors for five representative case histories of residential damage in the Northridge earthquake.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

The Role of Geotechnical Factors in Northridge Earthquake Residential Damage

New York, New York

On three projects, one a class action law suit and two involving readjustment of insurance claims, we evaluated the impact of the 1994 Mw 6.7 Northridge, California earthquake on over 1,600 residential properties. For each of the properties, we reviewed previous reports on the condition of the site immediately after the earthquake, undertook a site visit to observe current conditions, undertook site-specific geotechnical investigations, as appropriate, and documented our findings on the impact of long-term and earthquakerelated geotechnical factors on property damage. We have identified the following significant geotechnical factors that contribute to residential earthquake damage: (a) hillside sites; (b) cut/fill transitions; (c) expansive soils; (d) liquefied sandy soils; and (e) deep soft soils. This paper summarizes and presents our findings regarding these factors for five representative case histories of residential damage in the Northridge earthquake.