Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

Results of slope stability analyses for an inferred slip surface in a landslide along the Columbia River in the State of Washington are presented. The numerical analyses were made using limit-equilibrium-based computer program SSTAB2 and a commercially available continuum-mechanics-based computer program, FLAC. For the known and best understood/estimated field conditions, results of SSTAB2 analyses indicate validity of the inferred slip surface. However, the same is not true with the results of FLAC. Reasons for the differences in results from the two essentially independent methods of analysis are discussed. Preference for use of one method over the other in studying occurrence of ground instability is indicated. Usefulness of the two methods of analysis in quantitative assessments of landslides is mentioned.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Numerical Assessment of an Estimated Slip Surface, Locke Island Landslides, Columbia River, South-Central Washington State, USA

New York, New York

Results of slope stability analyses for an inferred slip surface in a landslide along the Columbia River in the State of Washington are presented. The numerical analyses were made using limit-equilibrium-based computer program SSTAB2 and a commercially available continuum-mechanics-based computer program, FLAC. For the known and best understood/estimated field conditions, results of SSTAB2 analyses indicate validity of the inferred slip surface. However, the same is not true with the results of FLAC. Reasons for the differences in results from the two essentially independent methods of analysis are discussed. Preference for use of one method over the other in studying occurrence of ground instability is indicated. Usefulness of the two methods of analysis in quantitative assessments of landslides is mentioned.