Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

A full-scale failure test has been performed on an old river dyke in the Netherlands, to determine its actual strength against failure due to the uplift mechanism and to validate the Van model for the stability analysis of dykes prone to uplift induced failure. The test has been a success and clearly showed the relevance and significance of the uplift mechanism. In combination with earlier verifications, the Van model was found to be suitable, which has already lead to significant reductions on dyke reinforcement projects. The large gap between the actual strength and the calculated strength was confirmed. This gap appeared to be partly necessary because of the large variation in the results of dyke stability analyses by different geotechnical consultants. For the near future, the test may serve as an important benchmark for the development of a more rationally based safety philosophy.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Lessons Learned from a Full-Scale Dyke Failure Test

New York, New York

A full-scale failure test has been performed on an old river dyke in the Netherlands, to determine its actual strength against failure due to the uplift mechanism and to validate the Van model for the stability analysis of dykes prone to uplift induced failure. The test has been a success and clearly showed the relevance and significance of the uplift mechanism. In combination with earlier verifications, the Van model was found to be suitable, which has already lead to significant reductions on dyke reinforcement projects. The large gap between the actual strength and the calculated strength was confirmed. This gap appeared to be partly necessary because of the large variation in the results of dyke stability analyses by different geotechnical consultants. For the near future, the test may serve as an important benchmark for the development of a more rationally based safety philosophy.