Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

In May 2002, a landslide on the south bank of the Blackwater River damaged the Missouri Route K bridge that crosses it. A flood on the river triggered the landslide. Based on the field investigation and stability back-analysis, it appeared that the landslide actually consisted of two separate slides – a shallow slide triggered by rapid drawdown of the river and a deep slide triggered by artesian water pressures in a subsurface gravel layer. A rock berm that was keyed into the gravel was constructed to stabilize the slope. The rock toe berm was designed to resist both the shallow and deep slide by providing weight to the slope to prevent a rapid drawdown failure and providing a drainage outlet to relieve artesian pressures in the gravel layer.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Landslide Stabilization at Missouri Route K Bridge over Blackwater River

New York, New York

In May 2002, a landslide on the south bank of the Blackwater River damaged the Missouri Route K bridge that crosses it. A flood on the river triggered the landslide. Based on the field investigation and stability back-analysis, it appeared that the landslide actually consisted of two separate slides – a shallow slide triggered by rapid drawdown of the river and a deep slide triggered by artesian water pressures in a subsurface gravel layer. A rock berm that was keyed into the gravel was constructed to stabilize the slope. The rock toe berm was designed to resist both the shallow and deep slide by providing weight to the slope to prevent a rapid drawdown failure and providing a drainage outlet to relieve artesian pressures in the gravel layer.