Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

The 513-acre Cherry Island Landfill is located at the junction of the Delaware and Christina Rivers near Wilmington, Delaware. Today the landfill receives approximately 1,850 tons of waste per day. The landfill was constructed directly on soft dredge materials and river deposits which act as a natural liner. Due to the unique geotechnical characteristics at the site, potentially large deformation and slope stability were concerns during the planning and development of the landfill due to the expected high rates of waste placement. Slope stability and finite difference analysis were performed to develop adequate filling plans to cope with the expected high rates of waste placement. In addition, approximately 300 geotechnical instruments were installed during and after construction. These instruments include inclinometers, open standpipe piezometers, vibrating wire piezometers, pneumatic piezometers, settlement plates, vibrating wire thermistors, and pneumatic total pressure cells. To process and evaluate the large amount of data collected every month, a Geographical Information System (GIS) was incorporated which allows rapid visualization of important parameters. The results obtained from the analysis together with the instrumentation data provide a special insight into the behavior of large landfills constructed on soft soils. This paper presents a discussion of the procedures for analysis and monitoring of the landfill and the main results obtained. This paper also describes the issues involved in installing and maintaining instrumentation for this type of application.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Cherry Island. Assessing the Behavior of a Large Landfill Using Geotechnical Instrumentation

New York, New York

The 513-acre Cherry Island Landfill is located at the junction of the Delaware and Christina Rivers near Wilmington, Delaware. Today the landfill receives approximately 1,850 tons of waste per day. The landfill was constructed directly on soft dredge materials and river deposits which act as a natural liner. Due to the unique geotechnical characteristics at the site, potentially large deformation and slope stability were concerns during the planning and development of the landfill due to the expected high rates of waste placement. Slope stability and finite difference analysis were performed to develop adequate filling plans to cope with the expected high rates of waste placement. In addition, approximately 300 geotechnical instruments were installed during and after construction. These instruments include inclinometers, open standpipe piezometers, vibrating wire piezometers, pneumatic piezometers, settlement plates, vibrating wire thermistors, and pneumatic total pressure cells. To process and evaluate the large amount of data collected every month, a Geographical Information System (GIS) was incorporated which allows rapid visualization of important parameters. The results obtained from the analysis together with the instrumentation data provide a special insight into the behavior of large landfills constructed on soft soils. This paper presents a discussion of the procedures for analysis and monitoring of the landfill and the main results obtained. This paper also describes the issues involved in installing and maintaining instrumentation for this type of application.