Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

The McClusky Canal, located in central North Dakota, crosses the divide between the Hudson Bay and Gulf of Mexico drainages. The 74 mile (120 km) long canal has a maximum cut depth of approximately 115 feet (35.1 m) and an average cut depth of 40 ft (12.2 m). Slope failures in deep cuts of high plasticity clay have occurred sporadically since its construction in the 1970s. In addition, a large number of deep failures occurred during construction and recently. The slope failures are examples of the classic problems of construction slope instability and progressive failure. This paper chronicles half a century of geotechnical engineering related to the McClusky Canal beginning with feasibility design investigation in the mid 1950s. It includes discussion of stability methods, stability investigations, and remediation efforts of the 1950s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 2000.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

An Unstable Deep Canal Cut in Fat Clay – A Case History of Slope Failures on the McClusky Canal, North Dakota

New York, New York

The McClusky Canal, located in central North Dakota, crosses the divide between the Hudson Bay and Gulf of Mexico drainages. The 74 mile (120 km) long canal has a maximum cut depth of approximately 115 feet (35.1 m) and an average cut depth of 40 ft (12.2 m). Slope failures in deep cuts of high plasticity clay have occurred sporadically since its construction in the 1970s. In addition, a large number of deep failures occurred during construction and recently. The slope failures are examples of the classic problems of construction slope instability and progressive failure. This paper chronicles half a century of geotechnical engineering related to the McClusky Canal beginning with feasibility design investigation in the mid 1950s. It includes discussion of stability methods, stability investigations, and remediation efforts of the 1950s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 2000.