Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

Seismicity in Mexico is largely influenced by subduction earthquakes that originate along much of its Pacific Coast. These events have recurrently damaged Mexico City but other less frequent earthquakes produced by other sources and mechanisms also contribute to seismic hazard there and have damaged other important cities and towns. In this paper we review, from the point of view of geotechnical engineering, the effects of three of these less frequent events: the Manzanillo earthquake of Octobrer 9, 1995, the Tehuacán Earthquake of June 6, 1999 and the Tecomán Earthquake of January 21, 2003.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Three Recent Damaging Earthquakes in Mexico

New York, New York

Seismicity in Mexico is largely influenced by subduction earthquakes that originate along much of its Pacific Coast. These events have recurrently damaged Mexico City but other less frequent earthquakes produced by other sources and mechanisms also contribute to seismic hazard there and have damaged other important cities and towns. In this paper we review, from the point of view of geotechnical engineering, the effects of three of these less frequent events: the Manzanillo earthquake of Octobrer 9, 1995, the Tehuacán Earthquake of June 6, 1999 and the Tecomán Earthquake of January 21, 2003.