Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

When the World Trade Center was destroyed the transit link connecting Lower Manhattan and New Jersey, the Port Authority’s Trans Hudson system or PATH, was cut. The PATH station, which was located beneath the WTC, was destroyed, the two tunnels under the Hudson River were flooded, and the first PATH station in New Jersey was rendered useless for train movements. Immediately after Sept 11, the re-establishment of the downtown PATH service was identified as a key element in the revitalization of Lower Manhattan. The re-establishment of PATH service required that three elements of major construction be completed. These were the construction of a new temporary PATH station in the basement of the old WTC, the complete refurbishment of the Hudson River tunnels, and creation of a temporary terminal station at Exchange Place. The new WTC PATH station is founded on footings on bedrock, while the connecting pedestrian corridors are founded on the caissons that originally supported the WTC Plaza. The reconstruction of the PATH river tunnels required the complete gutting of the tunnels to remove all the electrical systems, duct banks, and track bed, which were 100 years old. The electrical and signal systems were replaced with modern systems and the original timber tie and ballast track bed was replaced with a direct fixation rail system. In order to reconfigure the Exchange Place station into a terminal station a system of track crossovers was mined through rock on the west side of the station. The tight 18-month schedule hinged on the new tunnel lining design. The schedule would not permit construction of traditional cast-in-place concrete linings. The Port Authority selected a more rapid construction option for the final lining, fiber-reinforced, sprayed-on-concrete. To maintain schedule, traditional drill and blast mining methods were abandoned and mechanical roadheaders were used to excavate the bulk of the rock removal.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Restoration of PATH Service to Lower Manhattan

New York, New York

When the World Trade Center was destroyed the transit link connecting Lower Manhattan and New Jersey, the Port Authority’s Trans Hudson system or PATH, was cut. The PATH station, which was located beneath the WTC, was destroyed, the two tunnels under the Hudson River were flooded, and the first PATH station in New Jersey was rendered useless for train movements. Immediately after Sept 11, the re-establishment of the downtown PATH service was identified as a key element in the revitalization of Lower Manhattan. The re-establishment of PATH service required that three elements of major construction be completed. These were the construction of a new temporary PATH station in the basement of the old WTC, the complete refurbishment of the Hudson River tunnels, and creation of a temporary terminal station at Exchange Place. The new WTC PATH station is founded on footings on bedrock, while the connecting pedestrian corridors are founded on the caissons that originally supported the WTC Plaza. The reconstruction of the PATH river tunnels required the complete gutting of the tunnels to remove all the electrical systems, duct banks, and track bed, which were 100 years old. The electrical and signal systems were replaced with modern systems and the original timber tie and ballast track bed was replaced with a direct fixation rail system. In order to reconfigure the Exchange Place station into a terminal station a system of track crossovers was mined through rock on the west side of the station. The tight 18-month schedule hinged on the new tunnel lining design. The schedule would not permit construction of traditional cast-in-place concrete linings. The Port Authority selected a more rapid construction option for the final lining, fiber-reinforced, sprayed-on-concrete. To maintain schedule, traditional drill and blast mining methods were abandoned and mechanical roadheaders were used to excavate the bulk of the rock removal.