Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

In 1967 the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) undertook the construction of the World Trade Center (WTC) diaphragm (slurry) walls, installation of the lateral support system and the excavation of the site, commonly referred to as the “Bathtub”. The work took two years to complete. In 2001 the City of New York undertook the re-excavation of the site after the terrorist attacks. The recovery work took eight months to complete. When the World Trade Center Recovery Effort officially concluded on May 30, 2002, reconstruction was already underway. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey had already completed its plans for the reconstruction of the Port Authority Trans Hudson (PATH) tubes and a temporary station. New York City Transit (NYCT) started the reconstruction of the Interboro Rapid Transit (IRT) 1 and 9 line tunnel in Greenwich Street after having already restored service on the Brooklyn Manhattan Transit (BMT) N and R lines in Church Street. Silverstein Properties started reconstruction of World Trade Center 7 (WTC 7) and the construction of the Consolidated Edison (Con Ed) transformer vaults located within the base of the WTC 7 building. These replacement structures, when combined with other existing structures such as the slurry wall, affect future development of the World Trade Center site. This paper will discuss the original construction of the “Bathtub”, the recovery effort, changes at the site since May 2002, conditions which will affect construction in the future and proposals for new construction.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

The World Trade Center “Bathtub”, a Case History

New York, New York

In 1967 the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) undertook the construction of the World Trade Center (WTC) diaphragm (slurry) walls, installation of the lateral support system and the excavation of the site, commonly referred to as the “Bathtub”. The work took two years to complete. In 2001 the City of New York undertook the re-excavation of the site after the terrorist attacks. The recovery work took eight months to complete. When the World Trade Center Recovery Effort officially concluded on May 30, 2002, reconstruction was already underway. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey had already completed its plans for the reconstruction of the Port Authority Trans Hudson (PATH) tubes and a temporary station. New York City Transit (NYCT) started the reconstruction of the Interboro Rapid Transit (IRT) 1 and 9 line tunnel in Greenwich Street after having already restored service on the Brooklyn Manhattan Transit (BMT) N and R lines in Church Street. Silverstein Properties started reconstruction of World Trade Center 7 (WTC 7) and the construction of the Consolidated Edison (Con Ed) transformer vaults located within the base of the WTC 7 building. These replacement structures, when combined with other existing structures such as the slurry wall, affect future development of the World Trade Center site. This paper will discuss the original construction of the “Bathtub”, the recovery effort, changes at the site since May 2002, conditions which will affect construction in the future and proposals for new construction.