Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

This paper reviews the anatomy of predictions for pile and pile group performance, and discusses the various facets of the prediction process. A series of case histories is presented in which successful predictions were made of the pile performance. Most of these cases involve a single pile or a small group of piles. A further series of case histories is then discussed in which the predictions were far less successful. Most of these cases involve larger pile groups. The reasons for the success or otherwise of the predictions are discussed, and it is concluded that successful predictions require a combination of good ground characterization, a sound theory which reflects the mechanisms of behavior, appropriate selection of the necessary geotechnical parameters, and a good knowledge of the applied loadings, together with a measure of good fortune.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Success and Failure in Predicting Pile Performance

New York, New York

This paper reviews the anatomy of predictions for pile and pile group performance, and discusses the various facets of the prediction process. A series of case histories is presented in which successful predictions were made of the pile performance. Most of these cases involve a single pile or a small group of piles. A further series of case histories is then discussed in which the predictions were far less successful. Most of these cases involve larger pile groups. The reasons for the success or otherwise of the predictions are discussed, and it is concluded that successful predictions require a combination of good ground characterization, a sound theory which reflects the mechanisms of behavior, appropriate selection of the necessary geotechnical parameters, and a good knowledge of the applied loadings, together with a measure of good fortune.