Alternative Title

Paper No. 10.01

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

The environmental regulation for Ranger Uranium Mine, in the Northern Territory, Australia, requires the stored tailings (irrespective of where they are finally stored, whether in a tailings dam or in mined-out pits) be capped safely to minimise contamination, erosion and radon gas emission, and also to enable the site to be rehabilitated through revegetation. The hydraulically deposited neutralised tailings in the existing tailings dam have a ‘gel-like’ structure which hinders the consolidation process. Consequently, the in situ tailings have a high water content, low permeability and extremely low shear strength. The present paper describes the case history of a successful capping trial constructed on these extremely soft tailings. Environmental geotechnical issues are highlighted and investigated. Results, especially the characteristics of the tailings observed during the construction and subsequent monitoring, are also discussed.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Capping of an Extremely Soft Neutralised Uranium Tailings − A Case History in Environmental Geomechanics

St. Louis, Missouri

The environmental regulation for Ranger Uranium Mine, in the Northern Territory, Australia, requires the stored tailings (irrespective of where they are finally stored, whether in a tailings dam or in mined-out pits) be capped safely to minimise contamination, erosion and radon gas emission, and also to enable the site to be rehabilitated through revegetation. The hydraulically deposited neutralised tailings in the existing tailings dam have a ‘gel-like’ structure which hinders the consolidation process. Consequently, the in situ tailings have a high water content, low permeability and extremely low shear strength. The present paper describes the case history of a successful capping trial constructed on these extremely soft tailings. Environmental geotechnical issues are highlighted and investigated. Results, especially the characteristics of the tailings observed during the construction and subsequent monitoring, are also discussed.