Alternative Title

Paper No. 9.15

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

Indeterminate combined with evaluating the safety of existing lifeline systems are, large and here one would expect format risk and reliability techniques to have found their most urgent need. Besides, risk analysis has languished in safety practice, is only now beginning to appear in established safety programs in my country. It is of interest to explore the reasons why this has been so, and to point the way to the adaptations that are necessary if risk analysis is to assume its deserved role in life-line systems and related areas of geotechnical practice. This paper has proposed that geotechnical conditions are needed to enable more reliable predictions of performance in practical. The main problem can be establish finally to the fundamental differences in approach between engineering science and engineering practice. In discussing these differences Peck (1979) described how science reasons from first principles based on laboratory behavior and analysis, while field performance data and empirical methods provide the basis for practice.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Mar 8th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Geotechnical Risk and Reliability from Theory to Practice

St. Louis, Missouri

Indeterminate combined with evaluating the safety of existing lifeline systems are, large and here one would expect format risk and reliability techniques to have found their most urgent need. Besides, risk analysis has languished in safety practice, is only now beginning to appear in established safety programs in my country. It is of interest to explore the reasons why this has been so, and to point the way to the adaptations that are necessary if risk analysis is to assume its deserved role in life-line systems and related areas of geotechnical practice. This paper has proposed that geotechnical conditions are needed to enable more reliable predictions of performance in practical. The main problem can be establish finally to the fundamental differences in approach between engineering science and engineering practice. In discussing these differences Peck (1979) described how science reasons from first principles based on laboratory behavior and analysis, while field performance data and empirical methods provide the basis for practice.