Alternative Title

Paper No. 8.02

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

The project consists of a middle school constructed on a previously undeveloped site. Site development required leveling a mountain ridge and perimeter tills up to 150 feet deep to create the relatively level 15 acre building site. Access to the site required a 1000 foot long side hill road from the adjacent main highway. Neither the owner nor the design team obtained geotechnical investigations of the site. As a result, they failed to consider the impact of the geologic setting on seepage, ground water flow, and slope stability. Near the end of construction, slope instabilities occurred in a cut section of the entrance road and one of the major embankment sections. The owner, the county school board, hired the writer to determine the cause of the instabilities and provide testimony in their ongoing litigation. This paper summarizes the site conditions and project history, describes the writer's investigation, describes the dispute resolution processes, and presents two procedural lessons learned from the case: the importance of qualified professional geotechnical advice, and the inherent and sometimes unrecognized value of ADR procedures.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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It's Not What You Pay; It's What It Costs You. A Geotechnical Engineering Case Study

St. Louis, Missouri

The project consists of a middle school constructed on a previously undeveloped site. Site development required leveling a mountain ridge and perimeter tills up to 150 feet deep to create the relatively level 15 acre building site. Access to the site required a 1000 foot long side hill road from the adjacent main highway. Neither the owner nor the design team obtained geotechnical investigations of the site. As a result, they failed to consider the impact of the geologic setting on seepage, ground water flow, and slope stability. Near the end of construction, slope instabilities occurred in a cut section of the entrance road and one of the major embankment sections. The owner, the county school board, hired the writer to determine the cause of the instabilities and provide testimony in their ongoing litigation. This paper summarizes the site conditions and project history, describes the writer's investigation, describes the dispute resolution processes, and presents two procedural lessons learned from the case: the importance of qualified professional geotechnical advice, and the inherent and sometimes unrecognized value of ADR procedures.