Alternative Title

Paper No. 8.08

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

Claims for sinkhole damages have increased significantly since the passage of legislation in 1969 requiring Florida insurance companies to provide sinkhole coverage for residential properties. At many sites, there is little surficial evidence of karst activity (i.e. Areas of subsidence and depressions) to provide a direct link between a suspected sinkhole and damage to the structure. Whatever the cause of the damage, sinkhole damage investigations are becoming increasingly important. The karstic terrain and limestone bedrock typical of west-central and central Florida make the area susceptible to sinkhole activity. However, the geologic setting and potential impacts to structures is complicated by the presence of shrink-swell clays that cover the limestone materials, organic infilled paleokarst features or poor construction site grading practices. Subsidence-like damage to houses can result from other mechanisms such as decay and compaction of buried organic debris and organic-rich sediments, or movement of shrink-swell clays. This paper will present investigative methods and case histories that detail the extent of the field investigations, often with conflicting conclusions.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 8th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Is It a Sinkhole?

St. Louis, Missouri

Claims for sinkhole damages have increased significantly since the passage of legislation in 1969 requiring Florida insurance companies to provide sinkhole coverage for residential properties. At many sites, there is little surficial evidence of karst activity (i.e. Areas of subsidence and depressions) to provide a direct link between a suspected sinkhole and damage to the structure. Whatever the cause of the damage, sinkhole damage investigations are becoming increasingly important. The karstic terrain and limestone bedrock typical of west-central and central Florida make the area susceptible to sinkhole activity. However, the geologic setting and potential impacts to structures is complicated by the presence of shrink-swell clays that cover the limestone materials, organic infilled paleokarst features or poor construction site grading practices. Subsidence-like damage to houses can result from other mechanisms such as decay and compaction of buried organic debris and organic-rich sediments, or movement of shrink-swell clays. This paper will present investigative methods and case histories that detail the extent of the field investigations, often with conflicting conclusions.