Alternative Title

Paper No. 5.13

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

Provo Canyon, located in north central Utah, is known to have landslide hazards for many years. Construction to widen and straighten a 2.5-mile-long section of U.S. 189 known as the “Narrows” commenced in December 1995. This project consists of twin 300-foot-long two-lane tunnels, 3/4 million cubic yards of soil and rock excavation, 60,000 square feet of cast-in-place concrete soil nailed walls, and 90,790 square feet of mechanically stabilized embankment. During excavation for some of the cuts, landslides occurred that required remediation. Cracks were noticed near the northern portal of the tunnels which necessitated immediate stabilization. Observations during construction are presented.

Immediately north of “The Narrows” section of U. S. 189 is an approximate six-mile-long segment called the Upper Provo Canyon project. The project includes a one-mile section of roadway that traverses over some landslides, known as the Hoover Slides, which have been active for at least 60 years. The Hoover Slides are within a thrust fault known as the Deer Creek thrust. From the exploration program, geotechnical and geologic features were identified which permitted the development of probable chronological events of the Hoover Slides and postulated sliding mechanisms responsible for the movements.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Geotechnical and Geologic Features of U.S. 189 in Provo Canyon, Utah

St. Louis, Missouri

Provo Canyon, located in north central Utah, is known to have landslide hazards for many years. Construction to widen and straighten a 2.5-mile-long section of U.S. 189 known as the “Narrows” commenced in December 1995. This project consists of twin 300-foot-long two-lane tunnels, 3/4 million cubic yards of soil and rock excavation, 60,000 square feet of cast-in-place concrete soil nailed walls, and 90,790 square feet of mechanically stabilized embankment. During excavation for some of the cuts, landslides occurred that required remediation. Cracks were noticed near the northern portal of the tunnels which necessitated immediate stabilization. Observations during construction are presented.

Immediately north of “The Narrows” section of U. S. 189 is an approximate six-mile-long segment called the Upper Provo Canyon project. The project includes a one-mile section of roadway that traverses over some landslides, known as the Hoover Slides, which have been active for at least 60 years. The Hoover Slides are within a thrust fault known as the Deer Creek thrust. From the exploration program, geotechnical and geologic features were identified which permitted the development of probable chronological events of the Hoover Slides and postulated sliding mechanisms responsible for the movements.