Alternative Title

Paper No. 5.08

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

Complex loading and geometry conditions controlled the design of the shoring wall system at Benaroya Hall, the new home of the Seattle Symphony. A combined system, including three soldier pile and tieback walls and one soil nail wall, was used to shore an excavation that ranged from 15 to 50 feet deep. A 25-foot-wide block of soil remained between the soil nail wall face and an existing, underground bus station. Prior to designing the soil nail wall, a finite difference analysis was performed to determine potential movements of the station due to the excavation. The deflection estimates from the finite difference analysis closely approximated the actual field measurements obtained from inclinometer readings and optical surveys during construction.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Shoring Analysis, Design and Construction at the Seattle Symphony's Benaroya Hall

St. Louis, Missouri

Complex loading and geometry conditions controlled the design of the shoring wall system at Benaroya Hall, the new home of the Seattle Symphony. A combined system, including three soldier pile and tieback walls and one soil nail wall, was used to shore an excavation that ranged from 15 to 50 feet deep. A 25-foot-wide block of soil remained between the soil nail wall face and an existing, underground bus station. Prior to designing the soil nail wall, a finite difference analysis was performed to determine potential movements of the station due to the excavation. The deflection estimates from the finite difference analysis closely approximated the actual field measurements obtained from inclinometer readings and optical surveys during construction.