Alternative Title

Paper No. 5.04

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

This paper presents a case history of performances and predictions of a diaphragm wall which is subject to serve differently from its initial purpose for which the wall was constructed. The updated requirements associated with the additional excavation created a situation whereby the wall would become short embedded and behave like free-end supported wall. As the wall had been already constructed during the time of modification it was only possible to modify the excavation method and bracing system. Accordingly, the wall stability and possible toe movement were analyzed, to accommodate the updated requirements, by using finite element methods. Continuous inclinometer monitoring has been carried out during the construction and results are being compared and analyzed for predicted values. Performance of the wall based on comparison between the inclinometer monitoring results during different excavation stages and predicted results, are discussed. It has been found that excavation depth for first bracing layer and construction period are very important for diaphragm wall performance. Large initial movements in the wall strongly influence the wall movements in the successive excavation works. Construction practice plays a major role in deep excavation work.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Prediction and Performances of Short Embedded Cast In-situ Diaphragm Wall for Deep Excavation in Bangkok Subsoil

St. Louis, Missouri

This paper presents a case history of performances and predictions of a diaphragm wall which is subject to serve differently from its initial purpose for which the wall was constructed. The updated requirements associated with the additional excavation created a situation whereby the wall would become short embedded and behave like free-end supported wall. As the wall had been already constructed during the time of modification it was only possible to modify the excavation method and bracing system. Accordingly, the wall stability and possible toe movement were analyzed, to accommodate the updated requirements, by using finite element methods. Continuous inclinometer monitoring has been carried out during the construction and results are being compared and analyzed for predicted values. Performance of the wall based on comparison between the inclinometer monitoring results during different excavation stages and predicted results, are discussed. It has been found that excavation depth for first bracing layer and construction period are very important for diaphragm wall performance. Large initial movements in the wall strongly influence the wall movements in the successive excavation works. Construction practice plays a major role in deep excavation work.