Alternative Title

Paper No. 2.29

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-8-1998

Session End Date

3-15-1998

Abstract

Over the past 25 years there have been a large number of flowslides in Rocky Mountain coal mine waste dumps located in British Columbia, Canada. The flowslides occurred rapidly and displayed surprisingly long distance of runout up to 2 km. Detailed field, laboratory studies, and analyses indicate that static collapse of saturated or nearly saturated sandy gravel layers within the dumps are responsible for the initial failure and ensuing flow failures. In addition to field and laboratory studies, finite element analyses were carried out on three case histories. The analysis results indicated that the flow like liquefaction failures of these waste dumps can be triggered by gradually raising of perched water tables contained within thin layers or poorly draining waste material in these slopes. This paper reviews the site condition and failure pattern observed in the mountainous mine waste dumps and investigates the mechanism of static liquefaction failure by finite element methods.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-8-1998

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1998 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 8th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

A Case History of Liquefaction Flow Failures in Mountains Mine Waste Dumps

St. Louis, Missouri

Over the past 25 years there have been a large number of flowslides in Rocky Mountain coal mine waste dumps located in British Columbia, Canada. The flowslides occurred rapidly and displayed surprisingly long distance of runout up to 2 km. Detailed field, laboratory studies, and analyses indicate that static collapse of saturated or nearly saturated sandy gravel layers within the dumps are responsible for the initial failure and ensuing flow failures. In addition to field and laboratory studies, finite element analyses were carried out on three case histories. The analysis results indicated that the flow like liquefaction failures of these waste dumps can be triggered by gradually raising of perched water tables contained within thin layers or poorly draining waste material in these slopes. This paper reviews the site condition and failure pattern observed in the mountainous mine waste dumps and investigates the mechanism of static liquefaction failure by finite element methods.